OSA SOUTH

OSA SOUTH

OSA SOUTH

The Osa South region includes the southern half of the Osa Peninsula and contains many of its most iconic landmarks most stunning landscapes, shorelines, and wildlife.

Osa South is bounded to the east by the Golfo Dulce and to the south and west by the Pacific Ocean. To the north it is mostly bounded by Corcovado National Park but also borders the Osa North and Puerto Jimenez regions. It is a part of the peninsula that has a high population of wild animals that are typically easy to observe in their natural environment. Much of its extent is also auriferous with gold occurring in alluvial stream deposits and river channels. Its main economy has historically been cattle, rice and logging, but ecotourism has overshadowed these for the past 20 years or so, particularly given the increased visitation to the Osa’s ecologic lodestar, Corcovado National Park, which is a World Heritage Site and the crown jewel of Costa Rica’s vaunted national park system.
Continued at the [bottom] of the page.


The Osa South region includes the southern half of the Osa Peninsula and contains many of its most iconic landmarks most stunning landscapes, shorelines, and wildlife.

Osa South is bounded to the east by the Golfo Dulce and to the south and west by the Pacific Ocean. To the north it is mostly bounded by Corcovado National Park but also borders the Osa North and Puerto Jimenez regions. It is a part of the peninsula that has a high population of wild animals that are typically easy to observe in their natural environment. Much of its extent is also auriferous with gold occurring in alluvial stream deposits and river channels. Its main economy has historically been cattle, rice and logging, but ecotourism has overshadowed these for the past 20 years or so, particularly given the increased visitation to the Osa’s ecologic lodestar, Corcovado National Park, which is a World Heritage Site and the crown jewel of Costa Rica’s vaunted national park system.
Continued at the [bottom] of the page.

The Osa South region includes the southern half of the Osa Peninsula and contains many of its most iconic landmarks most stunning landscapes, shorelines, and wildlife.

Osa South is bounded to the east by the Golfo Dulce and to the south and west by the Pacific Ocean. To the north it is mostly bounded by Corcovado National Park but also borders the Osa North and Puerto Jimenez regions. It is a part of the peninsula that has a high population of wild animals that are typically easy to observe in their natural environment. Much of its extent is also auriferous with gold occurring in alluvial stream deposits and river channels. Its main economy has historically been cattle, rice and logging, but ecotourism has overshadowed these for the past 20 years or so, particularly given the increased visitation to the Osa’s ecologic lodestar, Corcovado National Park, which is a World Heritage Site and the crown jewel of Costa Rica’s vaunted national park system.
Continued at the [bottom] of the page.


Miramar   -

 Zapote   -

 Guanabana   -

 Tamales   -

 Sombrero   -

 Carbonera   -

 Matapalo


Miramar   -

 Zapote   -

 Guanabana   -

 Tamales   -

 Sombrero   -

 Carbonera   -

 Matapalo

Miramar   -

 Zapote   -

 Guanabana   -

 Tamales   -

 Sombrero   -

 Carbonera   -

 Matapalo

Property ID Property Name Class Area (Ha) Price Video
2019038La Balsa - 5.5Mountain Forest5.5$450,000.00 
2019036CarboneraOcean Front0.3$420,000.00 See here 
2019021Tamales - 1.2Ocean Front1.2$550,000.00 See here 
2019020Matapalo Peter - 1.1Mountain Forest1.1$275,000.00 
2019019Matapalo - 1.4Mountain Forest1.4$490,000.00 
2019018Matapalo - 1.3Mountain Forest1.3$455,000.00 
2019017Matapalo Peter - 1.2Mountain Forest1.2$300,000.00 
2019016Casa Roca Dura - 15Ocean Front15$3,900,000.00 
2019015Matapalo -0.14Ocean Front0.14$1,295,000.00 See here 
2019012SombreroRural0.4046$299,000.00 See here 
2019011Miramar - 2.5Mountain Forest2.5$275,000.00 
2019009MatapaloOcean View29.78$3,500,000.00 
2018047Guanabana - 1Mountain Forest1.5$199,000.00 
2018046Matapalo - 8Ocean Front8$4,000,000.00 
2018034Guanabana - 1Ocean Front1$850,000.00 
2018033Sombrero - 2140Ocean Front0.214$220,000.00 See here 
2018032Sombrero - 7860Ocean Front0.786$295,000.00 See here 
2018031Sombrero - 1Ocean Front1$330,000.00 See here 
2018030Sombrero - 1872Ocean View0.1872$64,500.00 See here 
2018029Sombrero - 1921Ocean Front0.1921$39,500.00 See here 
2018028Sombrero - 1788Ocean View0.1788$39,500.00 See here 
2018027Sombrero - 1Ocean View1$135,000.00 See here 
2018026Sombrero - 1Ocean Front1$350,000.00 See here 
2018025Sombrero - 1Ocean Front1$225,000.00 See here 
2018024Sombrero - 1762Ocean View0.1762$35,000.00 See here 
2018023Sombrero - 1866Ocean View0.1866$39,000.00 See here 
2018022Sobrero - 1802Ocean View0.1802$48,000.00 
2018019Sombrero -1.2Ocean View1.2$550,000.00 See here 
2017003Sombrero-1Ocean Front1$115,000.00 See here 
2016033Matapalo Lot 2Rural1.005$500,000.00 
2016032MatapaloRural0.353$250,000.00 
2016030Matapalo 1,4Ocean Front1.42$550,000.00 
2016003Agua Buena 66Mountain Forest66$650,000.00 
2016001Sombrero 1Ocean Front1$175,000.00 See here 
2015038Carate - 72Mountain Forest72.84$790,000.00 
2015036Guanabana - 2Ocean Front2$449,000.00 See here 
2015014Carate - 63Ocean View63.6$637,000.00 
2015009Sombrero 1.1Ocean Front1.1$375,000.00 
2015004Guanabana 0,8Ocean Front0.8$295,000.00 See here 
2014057Matapalo-1968Ocean Front0.1968$575,000.00 
2014017Matapalo - 0.1891 mtrsBeach Front0.1891$495,000.00 See here 
2014005Matapalo-30Ocean View30$3,000,000.00 
2014003Sombrero - 2500Beach Front0.21$220,000.00 See here 
2014002Sombrero - 1Beach Front1$350,000.00 
2013006Sombrero- 2.33Beach Front2.33$750,000.00 
2013001Tamales-1.91Beach Front1.91$350,000.00 See here 
2011014Matapalo - 1.4Mountain1.3$195,000.00 
2011013Matapalo - 4600Mountain0.467$70,000.00 
2011009Sombrero-1.3Beach Front1.3$395,000.00 
2011008Sombrero-1.5Beach Front1.5$495,000.00 
2011007Rio Oro-300Mountain300$1,500,000.00 

Osa South includes the fabled surf destinations of Matapalo and the similarly coveted neighboring regions of Carbonera, Sombrero and Tamales, each of which is lapped daily by the waves of the Golfo Dulce. North of Tamales, the neighborhoods of Guanabana and Zapote are behind the jutting Punta Tigre, which shelters the shorelines from the open Pacific Ocean and knocks the surf down a bit, making these areas less appealing to long boarders and wave rippers, but even more appealing to body surfers and swimmers.

Much of the terrain of the eastern sector of Osa South is flat, comprising an alluvial plane that rises very gently from sea level back to the foothills of the peninsular cordillera. These foothills start out close to the sea in the northern part of Osa South but then recede back from the shoreline in the Tamales area to then converge southward back again toward the coast.

Wherever the mountains are not too far back from the coastline the highlands offer great views of the gulf and its dreamy ribbons of mountains beyond that stairstep their way to the lavender heights of the Central American cordillera. Panama’s highest mountain, Baru Volcano, is visible on a clear day from all points of Osa South with an ocean view.

Rounding the bend of Cape Matapalo, the Pacific side of Osa South is made up mostly of large tracts of farm and ranch land on the flat coastal parts with forested mountain farms in the uplands. The end of the Costa Rican national highway system at Carate represents the farthest distance that it is possible to travel by highway from San José. The final five kilometers of this highway, from Rio Oro to Carate, is rolling mountainous terrain with deep jungle and stunning views of the Pacific and coastal lagoons teeming with snook and crocodiles. Carate is the jumping-off point for Corcovado National Park hikers and one of the Osa’s most celebrated destinations.

Osa South is completely off grid without any electrical power distribution and no public water utility anywhere. All power must be generated where it is used, either by solar power, hydroelectric power generation, or on an emergency basis using a fossil-fuel generator. An abundance of water means that water supply typically comes from springs or streams on private property. Shallow groundwater depths along the coastal planes means that hand-dug wells tap an abundance of high-quality water as little as a few meters from the land surface. Rarely are expensive bored wells required to source water. While the Pacific side has historically been beyond cell signal, a new cell tower in the mountains now distributes both telephony and Internet to the entire region across the 4G network.

Coastal properties are administered primarily by the Municipality of Golfito under use permits. A few coastal areas have been designated Natural Patrimony sites and are administered by MINAE.


Osa South includes the fabled surf destinations of Matapalo and the similarly coveted neighboring regions of Carbonera, Sombrero and Tamales, each of which is lapped daily by the waves of the Golfo Dulce. North of Tamales, the neighborhoods of Guanabana and Zapote are behind the jutting Punta Tigre, which shelters the shorelines from the open Pacific Ocean and knocks the surf down a bit, making these areas less appealing to long boarders and wave rippers, but even more appealing to body surfers and swimmers.

Much of the terrain of the eastern sector of Osa South is flat, comprising an alluvial plane that rises very gently from sea level back to the foothills of the peninsular cordillera. These foothills start out close to the sea in the northern part of Osa South but then recede back from the shoreline in the Tamales area to then converge southward back again toward the coast.

Wherever the mountains are not too far back from the coastline the highlands offer great views of the gulf and its dreamy ribbons of mountains beyond that stairstep their way to the lavender heights of the Central American cordillera. Panama’s highest mountain, Baru Volcano, is visible on a clear day from all points of Osa South with an ocean view.

Rounding the bend of Cape Matapalo, the Pacific side of Osa South is made up mostly of large tracts of farm and ranch land on the flat coastal parts with forested mountain farms in the uplands. The end of the Costa Rican national highway system at Carate represents the farthest distance that it is possible to travel by highway from San José. The final five kilometers of this highway, from Rio Oro to Carate, is rolling mountainous terrain with deep jungle and stunning views of the Pacific and coastal lagoons teeming with snook and crocodiles. Carate is the jumping-off point for Corcovado National Park hikers and one of the Osa’s most celebrated destinations.

Osa South is completely off grid without any electrical power distribution and no public water utility anywhere. All power must be generated where it is used, either by solar power, hydroelectric power generation, or on an emergency basis using a fossil-fuel generator. An abundance of water means that water supply typically comes from springs or streams on private property. Shallow groundwater depths along the coastal planes means that hand-dug wells tap an abundance of high-quality water as little as a few meters from the land surface. Rarely are expensive bored wells required to source water. While the Pacific side has historically been beyond cell signal, a new cell tower in the mountains now distributes both telephony and Internet to the entire region across the 4G network.

Coastal properties are administered primarily by the Municipality of Golfito under use permits. A few coastal areas have been designated Natural Patrimony sites and are administered by MINAE.

Osa South includes the fabled surf destinations of Matapalo and the similarly coveted neighboring regions of Carbonera, Sombrero and Tamales, each of which is lapped daily by the waves of the Golfo Dulce. North of Tamales, the neighborhoods of Guanabana and Zapote are behind the jutting Punta Tigre, which shelters the shorelines from the open Pacific Ocean and knocks the surf down a bit, making these areas less appealing to long boarders and wave rippers, but even more appealing to body surfers and swimmers.

Much of the terrain of the eastern sector of Osa South is flat, comprising an alluvial plane that rises very gently from sea level back to the foothills of the peninsular cordillera. These foothills start out close to the sea in the northern part of Osa South but then recede back from the shoreline in the Tamales area to then converge southward back again toward the coast.

Wherever the mountains are not too far back from the coastline the highlands offer great views of the gulf and its dreamy ribbons of mountains beyond that stairstep their way to the lavender heights of the Central American cordillera. Panama’s highest mountain, Baru Volcano, is visible on a clear day from all points of Osa South with an ocean view.

Rounding the bend of Cape Matapalo, the Pacific side of Osa South is made up mostly of large tracts of farm and ranch land on the flat coastal parts with forested mountain farms in the uplands. The end of the Costa Rican national highway system at Carate represents the farthest distance that it is possible to travel by highway from San José. The final five kilometers of this highway, from Rio Oro to Carate, is rolling mountainous terrain with deep jungle and stunning views of the Pacific and coastal lagoons teeming with snook and crocodiles. Carate is the jumping-off point for Corcovado National Park hikers and one of the Osa’s most celebrated destinations.

Osa South is completely off grid without any electrical power distribution and no public water utility anywhere. All power must be generated where it is used, either by solar power, hydroelectric power generation, or on an emergency basis using a fossil-fuel generator. An abundance of water means that water supply typically comes from springs or streams on private property. Shallow groundwater depths along the coastal planes means that hand-dug wells tap an abundance of high-quality water as little as a few meters from the land surface. Rarely are expensive bored wells required to source water. While the Pacific side has historically been beyond cell signal, a new cell tower in the mountains now distributes both telephony and Internet to the entire region across the 4G network.

Coastal properties are administered primarily by the Municipality of Golfito under use permits. A few coastal areas have been designated Natural Patrimony sites and are administered by MINAE.

Home        About Us        Listings By Region        All Listings        Services        Buying in CR        Find your Property        Contact Us