MOGOS

MOGOS

MOGOS

Mogos is itself a tiny hamlet located along National Highway Route 245 between the Pan-American Highway turnoff at Chacarita and the coastal lowland town of Rincon. For our purposes, the Mogos region comprises the entire northern shoreline of the Golfo Dulce from the water all the way up the steep mountains girdling the gulf and then down the more gently sloping back side of the highlands all the way down to the low wetland bounding the Sierpe River. We also include within the Mogos region those listings that are on the northeastern shores of the Golfo Dulce as well.

The Mogos region is part of the Canton of Osa, the county seat of which is located in Ciudad Cortes. It is a belt of mostly forested mountain land that extends from the isthmian mainland to the Osa Peninsula proper. Much of it is contained within the protected area of the Golfo Dulce Forest Reserve as well as portions of Piedras Blancas National Park.

Continued at the [bottom] of the page.


Mogos is itself a tiny hamlet located along National Highway Route 245 between the Pan-American Highway turnoff at Chacarita and the coastal lowland town of Rincon. For our purposes, the Mogos region comprises the entire northern shoreline of the Golfo Dulce from the water all the way up the steep mountains girdling the gulf and then down the more gently sloping back side of the highlands all the way down to the low wetland bounding the Sierpe River. We also include within the Mogos region those listings that are on the northeastern shores of the Golfo Dulce as well.

The Mogos region is part of the Canton of Osa, the county seat of which is located in Ciudad Cortes. It is a belt of mostly forested mountain land that extends from the isthmian mainland to the Osa Peninsula proper. Much of it is contained within the protected area of the Golfo Dulce Forest Reserve as well as portions of Piedras Blancas National Park.

Continued at the [bottom] of the page.

Mogos is itself a tiny hamlet located along National Highway Route 245 between the Pan-American Highway turnoff at Chacarita and the coastal lowland town of Rincon. For our purposes, the Mogos region comprises the entire northern shoreline of the Golfo Dulce from the water all the way up the steep mountains girdling the gulf and then down the more gently sloping back side of the highlands all the way down to the low wetland bounding the Sierpe River. We also include within the Mogos region those listings that are on the northeastern shores of the Golfo Dulce as well.

The Mogos region is part of the Canton of Osa, the county seat of which is located in Ciudad Cortes. It is a belt of mostly forested mountain land that extends from the isthmian mainland to the Osa Peninsula proper. Much of it is contained within the protected area of the Golfo Dulce Forest Reserve as well as portions of Piedras Blancas National Park.

Continued at the [bottom] of the page.

San Juan de Dios   -

 Bahia Chal   -

 Santa Cecilia   -

 Sierpe   -

 Golfo Dulce


San Juan de Dios   -

 Bahia Chal   -

 Santa Cecilia   -

 Sierpe   -

 Golfo Dulce

San Juan de Dios   -

 Bahia Chal   -

 Santa Cecilia   -

 Sierpe   -

 Golfo Dulce



Property ID Property Name Class Area (Ha) Price Video
2019007RinconOcean Front27$1,150,000.00 See here 
2018053Mogos - 39Pasture / Farm39.07$995,000.00 See here 
2015032Cabinas La Perla 0.o haOcean Front0.9$450,000.00 
2015026Mogos 151haOcean View151$528,500.00 
2015021Bahía Chal 38Ocean View38$5,000,000.00 
2015001Los Mogos - 4.5Mountain Forest4.05$175,000.00 
2014020Golfo Dulce - 200Beach Front200$1,500,000.00 See here 
2014018Golfo Dulce - 15.5Beach Front15.5197$375,000.00 

The terrain is mostly steep and forbidding, with the secondary forest 40-60 years of age and in places beginning to again resemble primary rainforest. The Mogos region includes a wildlife corridor that biologists point out as vital in sustaining the genetic diversity of the mega-fauna of Corcovado National Park, most importantly its population of jaguars.

The Golfo Dulce is the tenth deepest gulf in the world and was labeled by Jacques Cousteau as one of only four tropical fjords worldwide. The Golfo Dulce is sheltered from the open ocean and for this reason there is no wave action along the Mogos region shorelines. It is as still as a lake and ideal for boat moorings.

It enjoys migratory visits by both the North and South Pacific populations of humpback whale as well as the annual arrival of schools of spawning whale shark. The Mogos shoreline is particularly noted for the abundance of hammerhead sharks that migrate between the Gulf and Cocos Island. The Golfo Dulce hosts a wide range of fish and marine mammals, and the forests along its shores boast all the wild animals that you would expect from the Osa, from tayras and agoutis to peccary, tapir, and even the fabled jaguar.

The very steep slopes rising from the still waters of the Golfo Dulce provide for spectacular views along the ridgelines along which the paved highway passes. Many properties along this highland have multiple view sites that encompass the entire gulf and are among the very best views anywhere in Costa Rica.

A significant number of the properties in the Mogos region were never titled; now that much of the area is national forest land, those properties without title find it increasingly more difficult to secure title, owing to the passage of time and the requirement of sworn testimony by people now in their 70s and 80s.

Be sure while window-shopping this region to be aware of title considerations and the fact that cutting trees is forbidden nearly everywhere, so good prospects for purchase include title and a cleared area for building. Nearly the entire coastline is defined as Natural Patrimony, with maritime concessions administered by MINAE and not the Municipality.


The terrain is mostly steep and forbidding, with the secondary forest 40-60 years of age and in places beginning to again resemble primary rainforest. The Mogos region includes a wildlife corridor that biologists point out as vital in sustaining the genetic diversity of the mega-fauna of Corcovado National Park, most importantly its population of jaguars.

The Golfo Dulce is the tenth deepest gulf in the world and was labeled by Jacques Cousteau as one of only four tropical fjords worldwide. The Golfo Dulce is sheltered from the open ocean and for this reason there is no wave action along the Mogos region shorelines. It is as still as a lake and ideal for boat moorings.

It enjoys migratory visits by both the North and South Pacific populations of humpback whale as well as the annual arrival of schools of spawning whale shark. The Mogos shoreline is particularly noted for the abundance of hammerhead sharks that migrate between the Gulf and Cocos Island. The Golfo Dulce hosts a wide range of fish and marine mammals, and the forests along its shores boast all the wild animals that you would expect from the Osa, from tayras and agoutis to peccary, tapir, and even the fabled jaguar.

The very steep slopes rising from the still waters of the Golfo Dulce provide for spectacular views along the ridgelines along which the paved highway passes. Many properties along this highland have multiple view sites that encompass the entire gulf and are among the very best views anywhere in Costa Rica.

A significant number of the properties in the Mogos region were never titled; now that much of the area is national forest land, those properties without title find it increasingly more difficult to secure title, owing to the passage of time and the requirement of sworn testimony by people now in their 70s and 80s.

Be sure while window-shopping this region to be aware of title considerations and the fact that cutting trees is forbidden nearly everywhere, so good prospects for purchase include title and a cleared area for building. Nearly the entire coastline is defined as Natural Patrimony, with maritime concessions administered by MINAE and not the Municipality.

The terrain is mostly steep and forbidding, with the secondary forest 40-60 years of age and in places beginning to again resemble primary rainforest. The Mogos region includes a wildlife corridor that biologists point out as vital in sustaining the genetic diversity of the mega-fauna of Corcovado National Park, most importantly its population of jaguars.

The Golfo Dulce is the tenth deepest gulf in the world and was labeled by Jacques Cousteau as one of only four tropical fjords worldwide. The Golfo Dulce is sheltered from the open ocean and for this reason there is no wave action along the Mogos region shorelines. It is as still as a lake and ideal for boat moorings.

It enjoys migratory visits by both the North and South Pacific populations of humpback whale as well as the annual arrival of schools of spawning whale shark. The Mogos shoreline is particularly noted for the abundance of hammerhead sharks that migrate between the Gulf and Cocos Island. The Golfo Dulce hosts a wide range of fish and marine mammals, and the forests along its shores boast all the wild animals that you would expect from the Osa, from tayras and agoutis to peccary, tapir, and even the fabled jaguar.

The very steep slopes rising from the still waters of the Golfo Dulce provide for spectacular views along the ridgelines along which the paved highway passes. Many properties along this highland have multiple view sites that encompass the entire gulf and are among the very best views anywhere in Costa Rica.

A significant number of the properties in the Mogos region were never titled; now that much of the area is national forest land, those properties without title find it increasingly more difficult to secure title, owing to the passage of time and the requirement of sworn testimony by people now in their 70s and 80s.

Be sure while window-shopping this region to be aware of title considerations and the fact that cutting trees is forbidden nearly everywhere, so good prospects for purchase include title and a cleared area for building. Nearly the entire coastline is defined as Natural Patrimony, with maritime concessions administered by MINAE and not the Municipality.

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